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Avoid Repeat Ankle Sprains with These Four Simple Moves

July 15, 2015  /  04:13 PM

You’ve recovered from one ankle sprain. The last thing you want? To do it all over again.

Unfortunately, about 70 percent of people experience a second ankle sprain after the first. The reasons aren’t always clear. But experts believe poor balance plays a role—and that balance-boosting exercises can break the cycle of chronic strains.

San Jose State University researchers recently found simple kicking exercises—done with resistance bands similar to the TheraBand CLX—improved balance in both healthy and frequently injured men and women. Study participants did four exercises, kicking in four different directions, three times a week. At the end of four weeks, their balance improved significantly compared to a control group.

If you’ve suffered from a sprain, consider doing these moves regularly. But even if you fall off track, the results have staying power. In the study, better balance lasted for four weeks after the exercise program ended.

Goals:

Improve balance, Improve stability, Increase strength, Prevent injury

Activity:

Cutting, Exercising, Jumping, Kicking, Landing, Running, Weightlifting

  • step 1
    Begin by anchoring your CLX to a CLX Door Anchor. Place your uninjured ankle through an Easy Grip Loop and stand with your back to the door. Move to a lunge position with your injured leg in front, knee slightly bent. Slowly pull the back, uninjured foot forward against the band, bringing it in front of you and bending your knee. Return to starting position.
  • step 2
    Begin by anchoring your CLX to a CLX Door Anchor. Place your uninjured ankle through an Easy Grip Loop and stand facing the door. Move to a lunge position with your uninjured leg in front, knee slightly bent, and the injured foot behind you. Slowly pull the front foot backward against the band, bringing it in behind you with your knee bent. Return to starting position.
  • step 3
    Begin by anchoring your CLX to a CLX Door Anchor. Place your uninjured ankle through an Easy Grip Loop and stand sideways, uninjured leg toward the door and hips and knees slightly bent. Balance on your injured leg. Pull your other foot over and in front of you, across the injured foot. Return to starting position.
  • step 4
    Begin by anchoring your CLX to a CLX Door Anchor. Place your uninjured ankle through an Easy Grip Loop. Stand with your injured leg toward the door and your other foot crossed in front of it, hips and knees slightly bent. Balance on your injured leg. Pull your uninjured foot away from the door until your legs are slightly wider than hip distance. Return to starting position.

Dr. Phil Page

PhD, PT, ATC, CSCS, FACSM

Phil Page PhD, PT, ATC, CSCS, FACSM, LAT is a licensed physical therapist, athletic trainer, and certified strength & conditioning specialist. He graduated from LSU in physical therapy and received his master’s degree in exercise physiology from Mississippi State University, as well as a doctorate in Kinesiology from LSU. He has been involved in rehabilitation and sports medicine for over 25 years. Dr. Page was recently named a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. He is currently the Global Director of Clinical Education and Research for Performance Health, manufacturer of TheraBand, Biofreeze & Cramer products. His duties include maintaining the Thera-Band Academy website, directing the international educational programs and managing product research around the world. Dr. Page is also an instructor in the Athletic Training curriculum at Louisiana State University and a Clinical Instructor of Orthopedics for Tulane Medical School in New Orleans.

 

Dr. Page’s clinical and research interests include the role of muscle imbalance in musculoskeletal pain, and promoting physical activity for health-related physical fitness, particularly for chronic disease management. He is a member of educational committee for the “Exericse is Medicine” initiative for the ACSM. He is on the editorial board of the International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy and serves as a member of several national advisory boards. Dr. Page is on the scientific review committees for the APTA and ACSM. He regularly reviews grants and article submissions for several professional journals.

 

Dr. Page lectures extensively and provides workshops on a variety of topics around the world, including the Janda Approach to Muscle Imbalance. He was  awarded the Lifetime Excellence in Education Award by the Sports Physical Therapy Section of the APTA. He has presented over 100 international lectures and workshops on exercise and rehabilitation topics, and has over 50 publications including 3 books; most recently publishing Assessment and Treatment of Muscle Imbalance: The Janda Approach. He has worked with the athletic programs at LSU, Tulane, the New Orleans Saints and Seattle Seahawks, as well as the United States Olympic Track and Field Trials. He lives with his wife and 4 children in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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